161. ROBERT WHEATON’s solo album “Tomorrow’s World” (2017). A pre-release review.

Front cover artwork by Connor Sheehan (Image: R.Wheaton)

This album has been a long time coming. I’ve been friends with Rob Wheaton for the best part of thirty years; and heard many of his songs – enough for a boxed set in fact! Yet apart from recording with various bands over the years, his remarkable solo work has been unfortunately largely unreleased until now.

A Dagenham lad, now based in Devon, Rob has a broad range of influences and enjoys playing many genres of music; including many forms of Folk, Rock, and Blues, etc. He has been a member of many bands over the years including Dragon’s Playground; Farrow; Trousers; and after moving to Devon a few years ago, Folk band Devonbird. He is now a member of a new Devon-based unit, Fairmile, who played their debut gig recently; and about whom I may write soon.

But it was high time that he got himself into the studio to lay down his own stuff; and that’s where producer Mark Tucker of The Green Room comes in. This is the man responsible for the two excellent Devonbird albums on which Rob played and contributed (see my review of their second album #71). And his work with Rob on his solo project has once again, been superb.

The booklet’s rear cover (Image: R.Wheaton)

The album opens with the title track ‘Tomorrow’s World 1978’. It was written by Rob a few years ago, and I have had the pleasure of playing it with him a few times in acoustic clubs in Devon. It deals with the issue of what was predicted for the future back in ’78: ie, the optimism that largely hasn’t been realised today. He describes it as ‘a deeply ironic song… written from the perspective of someone back in 1978 who looks forward to a time, maybe four decades in the future, when the world will be a much better place’.   Its a light rock song with a comprehensive lyric and a catchy chorus. There are some nice complimentary keyboards on this one with some fine rhythm guitar.

Next is ‘Valley Song’. Over two years ago I visited Rob at his place overlooking the beautiful Ax Valley in Devon. We sat on his deck on the warm summer evening, and he handed me a beer, picked up his Fylde acoustic and told me that he’d just written a new song. He began to play, and I could immediately see how and why ‘Valley Song’ had been conceived. As I listened, the song seemed to belong to the valley as much as it belonged to Rob himself. I’ve heard him play it live a few times and always enjoyed it; but I wasn’t prepared for the very high quality of the finished master track when I heard it. It has been expertly crafted by Rob and Mark. The Uilleann Pipes were totally unexpected; hitting me with their eerie primal sound, that just seems so perfectly appropriate. It is a beautiful song that you can really drift away to. It is lyrically highly personal to Rob of course – about him finally escaping ‘the clamour of the city’ and chilling out in the beautiful West Country ‘where I want to be’ – but anyone can relate to it; and that is one of its many strengths. It is musically very satisfying too, with a lot of very good interwoven layers of guitar work (as you’d expect from Rob) that enhances, but never dominates the sound. I love it – but it sets the bar very high for the rest of the album…

‘Stardust’ was one of only two songs in the collection that I hadn’t previously heard in anything like a finished form. Rob did send me a very early instrumental recording of the track some time ago which I thought was OK, but I was totally struck by the final master from the opening bars because it had morphed into something quite special. It is a Psychedelic number inspired both musically and lyrically by the wonders of the universe; and conceived when Rob was just doodling with his 12-string Ricky through a delay pedal – one of those unexpected songs that seem to write themselves I suppose. He describes it as ‘…a piece of psychedelic fun on a cosmic theme’. There are some lovely guitar FX on this one that really appeals to me. Great bass too.

Rear case design (Image: R.Wheaton)

‘One Night Stand’ is a song that Rob wrote some time ago but recently resurrected for the album. Again, I knew it, and thought it was good, but the finished master has shown it to be an exceptional piece of work. The addition of the melodeon (courtesy of none other than Jim Causley) has given it a Continental/Parisienne feel; and there are some tasty Blues licks going on in the background too, yet as in other songs on this album, the guitar does not dominate it. Lyrically, it is about the shallowness and dissatisfaction of a casual sexual encounter – something that many of us can relate to.

‘Essex Song’ is another favourite of Rob’s live set, and another that I’ve played with him. It’s a good rocker about Rob’s upbringing in a nameless town ‘by a big car factory on the banks of the Thames’ – you can guess where! But the title is something of a misnomer, as that town is now part of Greater London and I must say thankfully, doesn’t represent most of the county of Essex! Guitar driven, with atmospheric harmonica, but unusually with a twin harmonised fiddle solo by Sophia Colkin of Devonbird. Great stuff.

‘Paddington’ is the other song that I’d previously not heard – in any form at all. It is strange how life is full of coincidences. Rob moved to Devon some years ago without realising until recently that his great great grandfather was born and worked only a few miles from where he now lives. But whereas Rob was lured willingly to the county, his ancestor was forced by financial and social pressures to leave it, and go to live in London’s Paddington Green area. This song then is about the plight of rural workers moving to the squalor of the metropolis at the height of the Industrial revolution. It is a Folky song with a menacing vibe describing ‘the regimental beat of the hammer’. It is fairly short (cut down from an original longer version); lyrically poignant, and cleverly worded. Jim Causley plays on this one too.

‘Jonathan’s Song’ is probably one of the most beautifully sad songs that I’ve ever heard. Jonathan Turner was an old friend of Rob’s from way back. He was a fine musician and song-writer; and ran a recording studio in Wales. Unfortunately he’d been suffering from Muscular Dystrophy since the age of 13, and his health slowly declined until inevitably he passed away. Shortly before his death, Rob was playing with Devonbird quite near to Jon’s home, but he was at that time too ill to attend the gig. So the band went to Jon’s house to play just for him. Soon after this he passed away and Rob wrote this wonderful tribute to his dear friend. It is another song that although inspired by Rob’s highly personal feelings, would appeal to any listener – especially one who has lost a friend or loved one. It has a hauntingly beautiful keyboard-enhanced rhythm guitar part, complimented by a lovely solo on a classical acoustic.

Rob playing ‘Valley Song’ at Hadfest 2016 (Photo: PTMQ)

‘Christmastide’ is perhaps a little ill-fitting with the rest of the album – being specifically seasonal. In fact Rob’s intention was to release the album before last Christmas, but unforeseen delays dictated otherwise. No matter anyway. Its a traditionally styled Folk song both musically and lyrically, but well arranged, and a joy to hear. Again, Sophia of Devonbird was the obvious choice to play fiddle on it. A nice touch is that she is mentioned in the lyric as well as Kath Bird (also of course of Devonbird). Rob tells me that it could be released as a single later in the year.

All of these songs are thoughtfully crafted; musically satisfying and lyrically thought provoking, with some innovative features and a few surprises. Vocals are good, with some well planned harmonies. I shouldn’t be surprised by Rob’s work because I know his musical abilities well, yet even so, I am often still pleasantly surprised with what he comes up. I suppose I should expect the unexpected!

The CD version comes in a standard Jewel Case with superb original cover art by Rob’s friend, artist Connor Sheehan. It illustrates the opening line of the chorus to the title track of course – ‘We’ll be driving round in hover cars’.  It is reminiscent of 70s concept album cover art, so I warmed to it immediately! The booklet contains credits and thanks etc, but no lyrics – not a problem though, as Rob’s vocals are very clear throughout. It will be available at gigs or direct from Rob’s website (check for release date); and eventually from CD Baby and iTunes.

I can’t speak too highly of this album – but even if I didn’t know Rob personally I’d be singing its praises. My only disappointment is that with only eight songs it is rather too short – I can think of a good dozen or more of Rob’s songs that could easily have been included, but I know he is too highly critical of his own work – I’ve told him! In fact he told me that a ninth song was jettisoned at the last minute because he wasn’t totally happy with it. If you appreciate good song-writing; intelligent lyrics; innovative arrangements and great guitar work in a variety musical genres, then you’ll enjoy this album very much. Long overdue – yet well worth the wait! PTMQ

Rob Wheaton’s website

Mark Tucker’s website

Connor Sheehan’s website

The opened booklet (Image: R.Wheaton)

160. MIKANORA (+ Open Floor) at RFC, “The White Horse” PH, Chadwell Heath. Tuesday, 11th April, 2017.

(Photo: G.Walker)

I have known the duet Mikanora (that is Mick Turner and Nora Kelson) for some time, as they are regular performers at (and involved with the running of) Romford Folk Club – now resident at The White Horse PH, Chadwell Heath. (For a description of the venue, but not the club, see my review #78). As is usual with RFC, regulars are often asked to perform an occasional Feature Night, and tonight was the turn of this popular duet.

The featured artists played a two-part set preceded by various Open Floor spots. Best of those this week I thought were The Rom Shanty Crew (now expanded to a six-piece vocal group) with their ‘Last Of The Great Whales’; and Gemma Boyd‘s newly written violin piece ‘The Boatman’s Mumbles’. I played a song by my friend, song-writer Tony Partis called ‘Riding Thumb’ with Rod Standen assisting on percussion.

(Photo: G.Walker)

Mikanora as usual had arrived armed with an array of diverse instruments: guitars; mandolin; mandola; concertina; bodhran; and low-D whistle. They began their set with ‘The Rout Of The Blues’, and included two of their amusing originals: ‘The Hermit’ and ‘South Of The Border’ (about US President Trump). Covers included: ‘The Bonny Ship The Diamond’; ‘Nancy Spain’; ‘Mantelito Blanco’ (a Spanish song about a tablecloth); ‘Donkey Riding’ (which is not about riding donkeys, but about logging); two Richard Thompson numbers ‘Crazy Man Michael’ and ‘Dimming Of The Day’ (‘You can’t have too many Richard Thompson songs’ said Mick!); and a fine version of ‘The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald’ on which Nora shone with concertina. A well deserved encore was called for, and given in the form of ‘Whiskey In The Jar-O’ which was performed with the aid of Gemma on fiddle.

It was another very entertaining evening at RFC thanks to Mikanora. Their set choice was varied, interesting and at times amusing. Thanks also due to MoC Smolowik; all the Open Floor performers; Garry Walker for the photos; and everyone at the club for organising the gig. PTMQ

159. SAIICHI SUGIYAMA BAND (+ support JOE ANDERTON BAND) at The NCBC, Essex. Friday, 24th March 2017; including an interview with Saiichi.

Saiichi Sugiyama (Photo: Karen Rockingham)

The Saiichi Sugiyama Interview: Well I must admit my son James and I went along to the NCBC knowing next to nothing about Saiichi Sugiyama, but intending to see his set, having heard good reviews. Then Karen at the club suggested an impromptu interview with the man, which she kindly and quickly arranged for us. No matter that we hadn’t done any research, because after being introduced to him, he told us that he talked too much; so with a minimum of questions from ourselves, he proceeded to tell us all that we needed to know about himself and his music – and fascinating it was too..

PTMQ: We started by asking Saiichi about his work with Andy Fraser shortly before he passed away…

SS: ‘I met a chap who was the UK PR for Andy Fraser, and he was interested in managing me, so we worked together for a while, and Andy got to hear my music. My manager asked him: “Would you be interested in playing bass for Saiichi?”

I had this song called ‘Melting Away’ that I wrote some years ago. Free was very much formative Blues-Rock, and Paul Kossoff was somebody that I listened to a lot when I was young, but I had to stop listening because I didn’t want to be influenced too much. I was on holiday in Japan and I had this strange dream that Kossoff was in an afterlife in a beautiful place, and I came up with this song called ‘Melting Away’. I played it at a blues festival once, but then I thought “This is too close to Free!”, so I set it aside, until I met Andy.

(Image: Saiichi Sugiyama website)

He’d been working all these years to get away from Blues-Rock. So I said “I have a song that I’d love you to play… but I bet you will not want to play it because it’s so much like your old band!” Anyway, he had a listen for the six minutes, and at the end of it he said “Yeah, I’ll do it, sure”. Then I was even more greedy and said “Did you notice there is a section for a bass solo towards the end?” and he said “Yeah I noticed that… that’ll be a challenge!” So he took the song away to California, and a couple of weeks later I got this thing through. He actually worked on the bass, and added things to it. He added some voice operated synthesizer sounds on it. He chopped a few things and arranged stuff; and put reverb on it. His bass playing was very unique.

Somehow I suddenly had this idea of putting a string quartet on it. I loved the way that Motown orchestrated, so I ended up getting in touch with John Shipley, the Musical Director for Jack Ashford’s Funk Brothers. I said “This is not Motown, but can you write a string section for it?” What he sent me was not quite what I had in mind. So I went out and bought a keyboard and my ProTools had some samples, and that became the quartet part. I wanted Andy to hear that but then he went. So that was that’.

PTMQ: Saiichi then told us about his association with Pete Brown – poet and lyricist for Cream among others…

SS:  ‘I met him in early 2000 and he started off playing in my band, because he sings and plays percussion. He said we should record an album, so i said ‘OK if I’m going to record, will you write with me?’ He said OK, so I was quite thrilled to see my songs with Pete on them. I was brought up in Tokyo in the 1960s and I would buy LPs with Japanese liner notes, and they’d talk about Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton… and poet Pete Brown. So the name was very familiar to me’.

Saiichi with The Quill and James, son of The Quill (Photo: Karen Rockingham)

PTMQ: So how did you get into in Western music?

SS: ‘Initially I was very taken with American music. I started off with Crosby, Stills and Nash; and Neil Young; and that got me into playing acoustic guitar. Its acoustic but its not Folk, its Rock. I was really fascinated by the way they played guitar, and then Steven Stills had an album out with a couple of very Bluesy tracks. And it just spoke to me; it was interesting – something different. I wrote a song when I was about ten, and it was a 12-bar Blues number. But I didn’t know it was Blues! Then I got into Clapton – Derek And The Dominoes. Then I dug deeper, into Cream, which I loved more; then The Bluesbreakers’ Beano album.

That’s how I got into the whole thing; because we were going through a period in Japan when people were looking very outward to the West; now they’re very inward looking. Now the Japanese have developed their own style of Rock which is quite Punkish. It doesn’t wash with me. They like their stuff and they really dig into it. But they don’t like somebody like me coming over from England – “He’s Japanese, he can’t be any good!” [He laughs].

Then I had a renaissance with The Beatles when I was about 18, and I really wanted to come here because this is where it was happening. I wanted to see Paul McCartney when he came to Japan in 1980 to play the Budokan. I slept on the street to buy the tickets, but he was arrested for marijuana possession and spent time in jail! So I had to come to England to see him.

But before then I had my eyes set on California because my love was Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. So I went to America for a couple of summers and I loved it. Then I was encouraged by a friend of mine who said “You’ve got to come to England”. So I did and found it more to my liking. I came for three months, which became three years, and now thirty odd years!

I first came over here in 1980 as a musician. I went through a period when I was absorbing everything. In 1989 I met Mike Casswell, Clem Clemson and Zoot Money, and my first album came out in 1994′.

PTMQ: Saiichi also talked about his son Mune Sugiyama, drummer and musical director of the band…

SS: ‘My son was unfortunately brought up, poor thing, listening to all my music! He says: “You really spoilt my childhood playing all these old peoples songs!” But it turned out that he’s actually a good drummer. He had a school band but someone dropped out, so I played in his band which was like a kind of prog/psychedelic jazz type of thing. So we got to know each other musically. Then when I needed a drummer he would come in as a dep. He knows all the songs that I wrote but didn’t do anything about, and he said “look, you’ve got to record these”; and he ended up becoming my producer and musical director of the band. He is my partner in that sense. He tells us what to do. He’s a perfectionist. He’s very bossy!’ [He laughs].

PTMQ: Saiichi is a very friendly, forthcoming and informative man to talk to – and yes, he does like to talk a lot; but that’s a good thing because he told us just what we wanted to hear. So thanks for the interview Saiichi. All that remained was for us to see his live set…

Joe Anderton Band (Photo: Chris Richardson)

But first The Joe Anderton Band set:  Whilst chatting to Saiichi in the Green Room, we heard the support band begin their set; and although I wasn’t able to give them my full attention, they certainly sounded good in the background. When we got back to our seats in the auditorium, Joe and the boys were in full swing with a great Stones cover – ‘Dead Flowers’. They finished with ‘Down By The River’ which I liked very much. What I heard of their set was very good. A band to look out for, I think.

They consist of the excellent young guitarist himself Joe Anderton (guitar and vocals); Andy Hayes (guitar); Joe Fowkes (drums); and none other than Trev Turley (on bass) – a well respected bassist who has of course been mentioned on my site a few times before, not least of all when he played a great gig at the NCBC last year with some good friends (see my review #121; & review #126).

The Saiichi Sugiyama Band set: The headliners were soon on stage. They consisted of Saiichi himself, of course (guitar/ vocals); his son Mune Sugiyama (drums/Musical Director); his long term bassist Ben Reed; Sam Grimley on keys; dep rhythm guitarist Mark Wright; and the remarkable Monica George on lead vocals.

Saiichi Sugiyama Band (Photo: Chris Richardson)

We were soon listening to the opening number ‘Never Turn Back’, off the debut album. This was segued into ‘I Never Turn’ (the newer, up tempo version) on which we first heard Monica’s fine vocal. It was a good start; and immediately followed by the only cover of the night ‘Sitting On Top Of The World’, with a great solo.

Saiichi said that he liked to mix up the eclectic influences of his youth back in the 70s, which explained the next song ‘Just One More Time’, which is quite a fusion of styles. Next he introduced another from the debut: ‘What’s Going On?’, explaining that he was never fully happy with his singing on the original. So this has now been reworked for female lead vocal; and I must say that Monica shone on it. There was some intense solo work from Saiichi on his Les Paul too.

Continuing with the eclectic menu, the band then played a Folk-Rock number called ‘Bitter Ground’ – surprising, and surprisingly good. It was a la Wishbone Ash Argus in its vibe – and therefore, I liked it a lot! The Funky ‘Into Your Arms’ followed, and couldn’t be more different, being described as ‘a dancy number’. Then the Funk continued with a song from The Smokehouse Sessions co-written with Pete Brown: ‘Is That You Baby?’

‘Magic Wand’ – another reworked number from his eponymous album of ’94 – changed the vibe yet again; and ‘China Doll’, from the same collection followed, with its haunting introductory arpeggio, although quite significantly reworked from the original. Rather Santana-esque in its lengthy solo, this one. A newer song ‘Night Indigo’ followed – a moody number with another good solo.  Great drumming from Mune on this one too. More upbeat was the radio friendly ‘Its Up To You’ with its 60s Motown vibe which suited Monica’s vocal style perfectly.

Next the song that I had been particularly waiting for: the Andy Fraser collaborated ‘Melting Away’. Starting with a haunting arpeggio and pensive vocal from Monica, it soon erupts into an unashamedly Free-inspired extravaganza – slow, heavy rhythm riffs interspersed with the gentler arpeggio sections, then giving ground to a Kossoff-esque lead guitar part; a fitting tribute to one of Saiichi’s main influences and a fine memorial to both Kossoff and Fraser. Excellent!

Next up was ‘I Got News’, a song with an interesting lyric and a nice guitar part. The latest single ‘Somewhere Down The Road’ followed. This is of course the reworked version of the opening track from the debut album. The original was very good, but this make-over is excellent; with female vocal and a far more dynamic guitar part. Without a breather, the great rocker ‘A Cellar full Of Noise’ (also co-penned with Pete Brown) ended the the show to great applause. It is a shame that the show overran because I know that the encore (if played) would have included an acoustic version of ‘Crossroads’ which I would have liked to hear. But both James and I enjoyed the gig very much.

The sheer variety contained within Saiichi’s set appealed to me greatly. Little of it could be described as pure Blues of course, but most of it had an undeniable Blues base. Inevitably, Saiichi shone on lead guitar; and Monica was at all times impressive as vocalist. The rhythm section of the band were all tight and reliable throughout.

Farewells: We had another little chat with Saiichi at the Merch desk, and he generously gave me two of his albums – his excellent eponymous debut from 1994 on CD; and his acclaimed Smokehouse Sessions on vinyl; plus his two latest excellent CD singles: ‘Melting Away’ which we’d just heard all about; and the remixed version of ‘Somewhere Down The Road’, which we’d also just enjoyed live.

As we left the venue, we congratulated guv’nor Paul Dean on another great New Crawdaddy gig; and had a few words with Joe Anderton and Trev Turley too. On the way out we bumped into Rock aficionado Stuart Walsh and his lady friend, who were very pleased with Saiichi’s set. And thus ended another good night at the NCBC. Thanks to all performers; the club volunteers; Karen for arranging things and photos; Chris for photos; bar staff; and everyone who was there. PTMQ

Saiichi Sugiyama website

Joe Anderton Band website

New Crawdaddy website

158. KADIA “The Outlandish Collection” (EP) (2017).

(Image: Kadia)

I was very impressed with Kadia‘s album East Of Alexandria which I reviewed last year (see my article #91). So I was keen to hear this, their new EP The Outlandish Collection (released on 1st April), and the band kindly sent me downloads to review this too….

It is a five track set of trad songs; but delivered in Kadia’s inimitable style – characterised by superb arrangements; fine musicianship and wonderful vocal harmonies.

Tracks are: Captain Ward; Cricketers Set (Instr.); Lady Isabel And The Elf Knight; The Keeper; and Randy Dandy. All fine renditions I must say. Nautical themes are present in some of the songs as with the Eden album; and if its the vocal harmonies that floats your boat, then you will find ‘The Keeper’ is sublimely impressive – I did! But everything on this EP is wonderful anyway.

I have only worked from downloads at the moment so I cannot comment exactly on the CD sleeve as yet. I plan to see the band when they play at a Folk Club not too far from me soon, so a gig review should be forthcoming too. The EP is available via Kadia’s website. PTMQ

This is the official video for ‘Lady Isabel And The Elf Knight’

157. DAVE HANSON “Live!” EP (2017)

(Image: D. Hanson)

Its always good to hear what ex-Dunwells man Dave Hanson‘s been up to; so when he told me he had a live EP due for release, I said I’d be happy to have a listen and write a brief review. So he sent me a pre-release promo CD.

I’ve written about Dave’s work before: his previous EP Blind Faith (see my review #74); and his album Almost Horizontal (see review #104). This new disc is a five track collection of four of the most popular of his tunes from his live set, that appeared on the two previous CDs (Joanna; Midday Sun; Blind Faith; and Island Sky); plus a blinding cover of Santana’s ‘Evil Ways’.

These songs are performed as good live as they sound in their studio versions; with the band tight and reliable; so its a good measure of the live show. Dave (who is a big fan of live albums) said that ‘…the band were really cooking that night’ – and I believe him! His characteristic guitar playing and vocals are impressive. I don’t know who is currently in the band, but they are very good indeed; and Becka Ward shines on backing vocals. It is a shame that ‘Devil’ and ‘Crystal Ball’ (from Almost Horizontal) weren’t included, but Dave has a lot of good songs to chose from these days.

The promo CD arrived in a simple sleeve with little info on it, but the music speaks for itself anyway. It is well worth getting hold of a copy. Its available from Dave’s website. PTMQ

156. ROBERT LANE’s debut album “Robert Lane”

(Image: R. Lane)

Last year I reviewed Brum-based singer/song-writer Robert Lane‘s excellent EP Ends And Starts (see my review #93). But I think it is also worth saying a few words about his eponymous debut album Robert Lane, which was released a couple of years ago now.

It is a thirteen track album; and typical of Rob’s work, it contains a variety of musical styles – something which I always warm to – various Pop, Rock, and Folky styles being represented; with Jazzy and Country vibes edging in at times too; showing broad and open-minded influences.

There are some really good songs in this collection; reminding me of such diverse luminaries as The Beatles; The Kinks; and The Jam at times; but generally Rob is a unique writer that you really need to listen to for yourself. These are well thought out tunes with good vocal melodies; interesting and well-crafted lyrics, sung beautifully clearly. There are some nice harmonised backing vocals too. I particularly liked ‘You Want It Both Ways’ and ‘Tomorrow’; but I must say they are all fine tracks in this collection.

Rob very ably handles all vocals and guitars + bass, keys and percussion at times too. He is also aided by various other good musicians as necessary. The album comes in a standard jewel case with a basic design, info, thanks, and credits etc. It is available from Rob’s website where you can sample his sounds.

He will be on tour in Germany and the UK throughout April; and in June with Kyshona Armstrong; as well as performing at the Withernsea Festival in August (Check his website). PTMQ

155. JAKE QUINCEY AND THE BIG RAD WOLF “Nothing To Loose… But The Blues” EP (2017)

(Image: Jake Quincey)

Recently my friend, guitarist Vern Waldie suggested that I listen to Jake Quincey And The Big Rad Wolf. They are a Blues-Rock outfit based in Canterbury, Kent (a hot-bed of earlier innovative bands); and they have just released their debut 5-track EP Nothing To Loose… But The Blues. Jake contacted me and sent me a link to the sounds on the band’s website, for review…

My first impression of this EP was that it is obviously influenced by the great luminaries who pioneered the transition of Blues into Psychedelic/Prog-Rock almost half a century ago. And this would be fair enough in its own right, of course. Yet having had a few listens, I think this first impression was a disservice to the band, because they seem to be pioneering themselves, in a kind of independent latter day parallel Blues-Rock evolution; demonstrating that there is yet more that can be achieved, given some imagination.

The music still has a Bluesy core of course, yet the parent genre has been transformed into a Psychedelic/Prog-Rock adventure; breaking new ground – and doing so in a way that left me wondering where each track would lead, because I couldn’t guess. Each track gets into your head and stays there; and that is why I like this EP; its familiar, yet different.

Quincey makes himself very useful, with some tasty guitar work – reminiscent of Hendrix and others; yet demonstrating a personally unique style. His vocals too are remarkably singular, yet reminding me a lot of Morrison. John Golding on drums is also working outside the box, in the same way that Baker and Mitchell did all those years ago.

Having only worked from a download, I haven’t seen the CD sleeve/case so I can’t make any comment on that other than to say that the cover image is a good one – simple but effective. If you are fan the late 60s Blues-Rock pioneers then I think you’ll  like this EP too.  It is available from the band’s website. PTMQ