Tag Archives: david hoyland

166. KADIA (with support CHARLIE LIMM + Open Floor) at LOUGHTON FOLK CLUB, Essex. Thursday 27th April 2017.

Kadia at LFC (Photo: PTMQ)

It’s always nice to get to see artists whose albums I’ve reviewed. So when I heard that Dorset-based Folk band Kadia were to play near to my home, at Loughton Folk Club, I was keen to get along to see them live.

Loughton Folk Club is held every Thursday in a pleasant upstairs room at The Loughton Club, a social centre in Station Road. (Check LFC’s website for details). It is run by Steve O’Donoghue (MoC for the night), and Carol Woodward, who are very welcoming (They had both recently come along to my Feature Night at Romford FC. See review #162). The club book a special guest every week, and have attracted some very well known artists. This particular night there was also a support set by singer/song-writer Charlie Limm. Floor spots are also usually available, and I was asked to do a couple of my songs too.

There were some very good Floor Spots; best of which I thought were Steve O’Donoghue singing his ‘Accident Of Birth’  – the second time I’d heard this in two days (See my previous review #165), but this time by the writer himself. And John Harris who sang and played a fantastic song about an Irish sailor (which I’m afraid I didn’t catch the title of, but I’m sure I’ve seen him play it somewhere before – RFC or Haverfolk perhaps?). I played two of my songs: ‘Nan’s Bread Pudd’n’ and ‘Mid-Life Crisis Blues’. Seemed to go down OK.

Charlie Limm (Photo: PTMQ)

Support Charlie Limm played two short but very good sets. Along with Emma Minihan , she is one half of a duet called Patchwork Skies, but tonight she was accompanied only by her roadie Sophie. Charlie, accompanying herself on acoustic guitar, played some charming songs; including two from the duet’s EP Go Outside: ‘Through The Dark’ and ‘Country Kind’. Other songs were: ‘At Your Side’; ‘Farewell Lullaby’ (sung acapella); ‘In This Time’ (which I particularly liked); ‘Forget-me-Not’ (her favourite flower, and a song that we were encouraged to join in with); and she finished with Richard Thompson’s classic ‘Beeswing’. Lovely songs and very effective. Sweetly sung too. The LFC audience were certainly appreciative. Maybe we’ll see Charlie play there again, with Emma too next time, perhaps? Later, before she left she gave me a copy of the Patchwork Skies’ EP Go Outside, which I enjoyed listening to on the way home and shall review on this site soon (see my following article #167).

Headliners Kadia also played two excellent sets. The trio consist of: Chris Bailey (guitar/vocals); Lee Cuff (cello/vocals); and David Hoyland (uke/mando/vocals). (For a review of their wonderful debut album East Of Alexandria, see my review #91). They are making quite a name for themselves on the Folk circuit, for their quality musicianship, their impressive song-writing, and their superb harmonies. I have recently reviewed their new EP of trad songs – The Outlandish Collection (see my review #158). They are currently working towards a new album of original material.

Steve O’Donoghue with Guthrie-esque guitar slogan! (Photo: PTMQ)

They played many of the original songs from their debut album, and all five songs from the EP; beginning with the acapella ‘The Keeper’. It was a magnificent display of the three part harmonies for which they are becoming well-known – therefore they set the bar high for themselves from the very start.

Earlier, I’d had a chat with them before the evening’s entertainment began. I’d been playing their debut album whilst driving to the gig, and I mentioned that I particularly enjoyed ‘The Beast Of Bodmin’, so they kindly incorporated it into their set for me; seguing it into the trad song ‘The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies-O’. A faultless performance it was too. Thanks lads!

Included in their two sets were songs from the Alexandria album such as ‘Silver Linings’; ‘The Navigator’; and ‘Origin Of Fire’. From Outlandish: ‘Captain Ward’; the instrumental medley ‘Cricketers Set’; ‘Randy Dandy’ and the wonderful ‘Lady Isabel And The Elf Knight’. Other songs played were: ‘Your Side’; ‘Sounds Of Earth’; ‘Rose In April’; ‘Annabel Lee’;  and ‘Old Dun Cow’.

Throughout the show, individual musicianship; tightness; vocals; and harmonies were, to be quite honest, faultless and impressive to say the least. In fact, a perfect display of their collective talents, and I’d highly recommend attending one of their gigs if you haven’t already.

I very much enjoyed the evening at Loughton Folk Club and I plan to get there again soon for a Daria Kulesh gig, among others. Thanks to all performers and LFC personnel for a memorable evening. PTMQ.

 

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158. KADIA “The Outlandish Collection” (EP) (2017).

(Image: Kadia)

I was very impressed with Kadia‘s album East Of Alexandria which I reviewed last year (see my article #91). So I was keen to hear this, their new EP The Outlandish Collection (released on 1st April), and the band kindly sent me downloads to review this too….

It is a five track set of trad songs; but delivered in Kadia’s inimitable style – characterised by superb arrangements; fine musicianship and wonderful vocal harmonies.

Tracks are: Captain Ward; Cricketers Set (Instr.); Lady Isabel And The Elf Knight; The Keeper; and Randy Dandy. All fine renditions I must say. Nautical themes are present in some of the songs as with the Eden album; and if its the vocal harmonies that floats your boat, then you will find ‘The Keeper’ is sublimely impressive – I did! But everything on this EP is wonderful anyway.

I have only worked from downloads at the moment so I cannot comment exactly on the CD sleeve as yet. I plan to see the band when they play at a Folk Club not too far from me soon, so a gig review should be forthcoming too. The EP is available via Kadia’s website. PTMQ

This is the official video for ‘Lady Isabel And The Elf Knight’

91. KADIA “East Of Alexandria” (2015)

(Pic: Kadia)

(Pic: Kadia)

Chris Bailey of Bournemouth-based Folk band Kadia contacted me recently, wondering if I’d like to come down to the West Country to check out one of their gigs – or failing that, review their (already highly acclaimed) debut album East Of Alexandria. Whilst I love that particular corner of England, I have no plans to get down there at the moment, but I was only too pleased to be asked to review their album. So he sent me a CD.

The band consists of Chris Bailey himself (Guitar / Vocals); Lee Cuff (Cello / Vocals); and David Hoyland (Uke / Mando / Percs / Vocals). Additional musician Rachel Bell was brought in for Violin on one track too. The boys have been together since Kadia were formed in 2012.

The album opens with their arrangement of the traditional ‘Wraggle Taggle Gypsy’. It is the fastest tempo version of the many that I’ve heard over the years – and unique for that. There then follows a collection of both trad songs and their own. All are quite remarkable in their construction; arrangement; musicianship; subject matter; and superb vocal harmonies. Several have nautical themes, but there is a extraordinary breadth of inspiration manifest in the band’s work. (refer to their website for details). My personal favourites are ‘The Beast Of Bodmin Moor’; ‘Mary In The Silver Tide’; The Navigator’; and the title track ‘East Of Alexandria’ (which is about the Battle Of The Nile, 1798). I’d also like to point out that the harmonies on the purely vocal ‘The Parting Glass’ are, it must be said, astounding well arranged.

The CD comes in a card gate-fold cover – the type with a plastic CD holder on one side.  It has an interesting design like a naive medieval map of the Mediterranean Sea. The titles of the twelve songs are marked on the map as though they were ancient cities – curiously, all are actually marked to the West of Alexandria, not the East! No matter; its a charming design. There is some basic info (credits / thanks, etc) but no lyrics. There is more info however on the band’s website; including a useful downloadable songbook.

I’d like to see Kadia live at some point – perhaps when I next visit the West Country. In the meantime, I’m recommending this album if you like quality Folk music that combines the trad with the innovative; and / or if you appreciate excellent close vocal harmonies. PTMQ

For Kadia’s website… (Click here)